Safety

Tenn. Bill that Would Make Stop-Arm Running a Felony Withdrawn, Updated

Nicole Schlosser
Posted on January 24, 2019
State Rep. Jason Potts withdraws a bill that would have boosted the penalty for passing a stopped school bus from a misdemeanor to a felony. He will submit a new bill with tiered penalties for first, second, and third offenses. Photo courtesy NYSBCA
State Rep. Jason Potts withdraws a bill that would have boosted the penalty for passing a stopped school bus from a misdemeanor to a felony. He will submit a new bill with tiered penalties for first, second, and third offenses. Photo courtesy NYSBCA

NASHVILLE, Tenn. — A proposed bill that would have elevated the penalty for illegally passing a school bus from a misdemeanor to a felony and increased fines last week was withdrawn on Wednesday, with plans for revised, tiered penalties.

HB 0055, which was introduced on Jan. 17 by state Rep. Jason Potts, would have increased the penalty for a stop-arm violation from a Class A misdemeanor to a Class E felony, punishable by a fine ranging from $500 to $3,000. Currently, the fine for passing a stopped school bus is between $250 and $1,000, Potts told School Bus Fleet.

Potts added that he withdrew the bill because he is planning to submit a new version that will include tiers for first, second, and third offenses. The first offense would incur a $500 fine and 8 hours of community service. For the second offense, violators would receive a $750 fine, 16 hours of community service, and a loss of their driver’s license for 30 days. A third offense would be met with a $1,000 fine and a loss of the offender’s driver’s license for 120 days, Potts explained.

“I am trying to make the state safer for our kids, and am looking for the best way to do that,” Potts said.

The final draft of the new bill is still a work in progress, Potts said. It may still include a Class E felony charge for violators when a pedestrian is struck and bodily harm is caused. Potts is also looking into charges related to the death of pedestrians when someone passes a school bus.

Related Topics: stop-arm running/illegal passing, Tennessee

Nicole Schlosser Executive Editor
Comments ( 1 )
  • Ellen. Gove

     | about 3 months ago

    I think it should be mandatory in EVERY STATE. But you need someone who will follow thru with sending number plates to the state

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