Subscribe Today

January 10, 2012  |   Comments (1)   |   Post a comment

Insight on timely topics

Speakers during the NAPT Summit discuss such issues as bullying, wheelchair use, training and alternative fuels. Attendees also see several new school buses.

by Kelly Roher and Thomas McMahon


SHARING TOOLS   | Email Print RSS « Page 3 of 4 »

Officials from Trans Tech Bus revealed that Kings Canyon Unified School District in Reedley, Calif., would receive the first eTrans all-electric school bus.
<p>Officials from Trans Tech Bus revealed that Kings Canyon Unified School District in Reedley, Calif., would receive the first eTrans all-electric school bus.</p>

Technology and alternative-fuel options in the industry
Technology and alternative fuels were other hot topics at the conference. During a transportation technology session, moderated by NAPT Public Affairs Consultant Barry McCahill, manufacturer and supplier representatives addressed developments that are impacting the school bus industry, or will in the future. Technologies that were discussed ranged from stability control systems — which the National Transportation Safety Board has recommended be required on new commercial vehicles over 10,000 pounds — to student-tracking devices to camera systems.

SBF Publisher Frank Di Giacomo moderated a forum on alternative-fuel technology. School bus OEM officials described their companies’ backgrounds in alternative fuels and their current offerings. They also answered questions from attendees, touching on issues like fueling infrastructure and driving range.

Industry professionals got their first in-person look at Trans Tech Bus’ new alternative-fuel offering — the all-electric eTrans school bus — during a special event at the NAPT Summit. (For information on the bus, click here.)

At the unveiling, officials revealed that Kings Canyon Unified School District in Reedley, Calif., would receive the first eTrans unit.

John Clements, director of transportation for the district, told SBF that he’s looking forward to the fact that the bus doesn’t require a petroleum-based fuel to operate.

“I anticipate that the bus is going to go roughly 50 to 55 miles a day initially based on the route that it’s scheduled for, but I can also see it being used for small activity trips that are 25 or 30 miles in one direction,” he added.

(The eTrans was delivered to Kings Canyon in mid-December. Clements said it would then be driven to Sacranmento, Calif., to visit the transportation community there.)

PAGE   Prev1234Next

Post a Comment

Read more about: Blue Bird Corp., bullying, conferences, driver training, NAPT, Thomas Built Buses, Trans Tech Bus, wheelchairs

This makes so much sense! Buses pick up kids, drop them at school, then go back to base (to charge). Then go back out a few hours later to make another run. Then charge over night. Could there be a better application for this young technology?

Pete    |    Jan 12, 2012 08:19 AM

Post a comment





Related Stories

Premium Member

Get bus sales numbers, transportation statistics, bus specifications, industry survey results, bus loading and unloading fatality statistics and more in the School Bus Fleet Research Center. Become a premium member today!
Log in Button Register Button

Newsletter

Get breaking news, industry updates, product announcements and more.