Alternative Fuels

Q & A: Station Locator Helps With Alt-Fueling Choices

Bonnie Trowbridge
Posted on May 14, 2019

The U.S. Department of Energy’s Alternative Fueling Station Locator has been helping fleets locate alternative-fueling stations for more than 20 years.
The U.S. Department of Energy’s Alternative Fueling Station Locator has been helping fleets locate alternative-fueling stations for more than 20 years.
As part of the suite of tools on the U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE’s) Alternative Fuels Data Center, the Alternative Fueling Station Locator (Station Locator) has been helping fleets locate alternative-fueling stations for more than 20 years. Fleet managers can use this resource to find locations to fuel their alternative-fuel school buses or to help choose an alternative fuel for their fleet.

What is the Station Locator? What information is included?

The Station Locator is a comprehensive database of more than 30,000 public and private access alternative-fueling stations, including biodiesel, compressed natural gas (CNG), electric, propane, and E85 (51% to 83% ethanol) locations.

Whether your buses run on propane, CNG, biodiesel, or electricity, the Station Locator has the necessary information for finding a fueling station that meets your fleet’s needs.

For example, public propane stations are categorized as “primary” or “secondary” based on their fueling capabilities. “Primary” stations must meet fill rate requirements, accept credit or fleet cards, and maintain normal business hours.

For CNG stations, the Station Locator details which vehicle classes can access the fueling infrastructure (e.g., Class 6 to 8), as well as the station’s fill type and the fill pressure.

Further, the Station Locator tracks the charging levels, connector types, and number of charging ports at each electric vehicle supply equipment (EVSE) location.

Find additional information about Station Locator data here.

How can I search for stations?

To locate a station, select the Public Stations tab, choose the fuel type, and enter the location near where you would like to find a station. The Station Locator will then display the available stations in that area. Click on an individual station to view more details.

If you’re traveling a new or extended route, you may search for alternative-fueling stations along the way using the “Map a Route” feature on the right-hand side of the Public Stations tab.

To view private access stations, including private fleet locations, use the Advanced Filters tab, select the “Station” menu, and check “Private” from the access options.

How can I submit information about my fleet’s alternative-fueling station to the Station Locator?

Fleet managers are encouraged to submit their alternative-fueling stations — public or private access — for inclusion in the Station Locator. To do so, use the Submit New Station form located at the bottom of the Station Locator. Alternatively, you may email the Technical Response Service at [email protected] with the station details. Note that private access fleet fueling stations will not appear in the main search interface of the Station Locator, as you must use the Advanced Filters tab to locate them.

Bonnie Trowbridge is the executive director of the Denver Metro Clean Cities Coalition.
Bonnie Trowbridge is the executive director of the Denver Metro Clean Cities Coalition.

My fleet’s alternative-fueling station is private. Why should I share the information with the Station Locator?

The Station Locator supports the alternative fuels industry by tracking fueling infrastructure development to help fleet managers select which alternative fuels may be best for their fleet based on local availability, assist decision makers in determining where to make investments in alternative fuels, and share valuable data. By adding your station to the Station Locator, you can improve the accuracy of Station Locator data, help show the growth in alternative-fueling infrastructure, and ultimately encourage future investment in alternative fuels.

Need general information or assistance implementing alternative fuels in your fleet? Contact your local Clean Cities coalition here.

Related Topics: alternative fuels, CNG, electric bus, propane

Comments ( 0 )
More Stories
Maintenance for propane school buses includes consistent oil and filter changes, and fueling at routine service intervals. Photo by Erwin Harrison
Article

Embracing Best Practices for Propane Maintenance

A growing demand for propane buses in recent years has sparked an influx of training programs for maintenance technicians. Here, industry experts share top tips and best practices for maintaining propane school buses.

Product

Mold, Rust Prevention Solution

BESI Inc. has added Damp Check to its product line to pull excess moisture from the air and reduce it to a level that prevents the growth of mold, mildew, rust, musty odors, and rot.

Be the First to Know

Get the latest news and most popular articles from SBF delivered straight to your inbox. Stay on top of the school bus industry and don't miss a thing!