Special Needs Transportation

Student With Autism Reportedly Left on School Bus

Posted on January 5, 2018
A 3-year-old Indiana boy was reportedly left on his bus for nearly five hours. The substitute driver who was apparently involved was suspended while the incident is investigated. Photo by John Horton
A 3-year-old Indiana boy was reportedly left on his bus for nearly five hours. The substitute driver who was apparently involved was suspended while the incident is investigated. Photo by John Horton

WARSAW, Ind. — A three-year-old boy with autism was reportedly left on his bus for nearly five hours, WNDU reports.

Gloria Miller told the news source that on the morning of Dec. 20, she had assumed that a substitute bus driver took her son Dawson to his preschool, but that she received a phone call from the evening route bus driver, who told her that a teacher said that the boy never made it to school. Ten minutes later, Dawson was found asleep on the bus.

Miller told WNDU that Dawson was happy to see her, and was hungry and thirsty. She added that Warsaw Community Schools apologized for the incident and wants to make it up to the Millers. Miller also said that her son will go back to riding the bus when changes related to checking for children are made or when an aide can sit with him on the bus.  

A statement obtained by WNDU that the district released the morning after the incident occurred said that the proper procedure is for the bus driver to inspect the bus at the end of the route to make sure no students are still on the bus. The statement also said that the incident is being investigated and that the substitute driver who was reportedly involved in the incident has been suspended until the investigation is complete.

To read the full story, go here.

Related Topics: Indiana, post-trip child check

Comments ( 5 )
  • William Cavico

     | about 11 months ago

    Child Check systems indicate procedure failures !! On my special need bus in the morning route I have a district aide. I have 8 moms or dads that send their child out to my bus. Then at school I have 5 teaching aides who come to my bus to receive the children They want to know about any child who is not getting off the bus especially If the parents' haven't called in advance. In the afternoon I again have a district aide and 5 teaching aides who bring the children onto my bus and watch me strap them in and they leave the bus only after I clear them to leave the bus. On route I have 8 parents looking for me and their child to arrive. so you see I have 8 parents in the morning plus 1 aide plus 5 school teaching aides. In the afternoon I have 8 parents, 1 district aide, 5 teaching aides, and me. So I have 8+5+1+8+5+1+1= 29 child check systems - not counting the expensive and dumd mechanical system. Bill C.

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