Special Needs Transportation

Wheelchair Securement Supplier Unveils New Floor-Integrated System

Posted on October 31, 2016
The Hide-A-Way’s restraints are fully integrated into the floor, freeing up floor space and increasing passenger capacity in the vehicle.
The Hide-A-Way’s restraints are fully integrated into the floor, freeing up floor space and increasing passenger capacity in the vehicle.

KANSAS CITY, Mo. — AMF-Bruns of America is unveiling its new wheelchair securement system, the Hide-A-Way, at the NAPT trade show next week.

The Hide-A-Way’s restraints are fully integrated into the floor, freeing up floor space and increasing passenger capacity in the vehicle, according to the company. 

Foot-activated for easier use, the system is designed to enable bus operators to quickly mix and match passenger wheelchair seats. Flip seats are engineered to be installed directly over the restraints, and the system can accommodate both wheelchair and non-wheelchair passengers, according to the supplier.

The system is suitable for buses of all sizes and commercial vans, and meets all applicable school bus regulations, according to the supplier.

AMF-Bruns entered the vehicle modification market in June. The supplier provides wheelchair securement, occupant restraint systems, and associated equipment for the safe transportation of wheelchair passengers. Other products offered by the supplier include the PROTEKTOR System Wheelchair and Occupant Restraints, which is designed to provide stabilization for passengers in the event of a collision, and the FutureSafe head and backrest, an adaptable and height-adjustable head and backrest with an integrated certified shoulder belt.

The Hide-A-Way is also designed to be foot-activated for easier use.
The Hide-A-Way is also designed to be foot-activated for easier use.

In the 1970s, AMF-Bruns developed the first wheelchair safety system and invented the world’s first four-point retractor wheelchair anchoring system, according to the company.

Founded in Germany in 1962, the supplier’s U.S. distribution facility opened in 2013.

Related Topics: NAPT, wheelchairs

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