Alternative Fuels

Electric School Bus Grants Given to 4 Mass. Districts

Posted on June 7, 2016
Four school districts in Massachusetts were each awarded grants of up to $350,000 for electric Type C school buses and chargers. Pictured is the Lion Bus eLion.
Four school districts in Massachusetts were each awarded grants of up to $350,000 for electric Type C school buses and chargers. Pictured is the Lion Bus eLion.

BOSTON — Four school districts in Massachusetts were awarded grants last month for the purchase of electric school buses and chargers.

Acton-Boxborough Regional School District, Amherst Public Schools, Cambridge Public Schools, and Concord Public Schools were given the grants through the Massachusetts Department of Energy Resources’ new Vehicle-to-Grid Electric School Bus pilot program, which aims to reduce school districts’ petroleum use and test the benefits of electric school bus technology.

“Massachusetts schools are leading the way by testing clean and resilient energy technology that will reduce greenhouse gas emissions in the transportation sector,” Gov. Charlie Baker said. “This innovative project will also reduce fuel costs and aid our commitment to a cleaner future for the commonwealth.”

State officials said that the Vehicle-to-Grid Electric School Bus pilot is intended to demonstrate that electric drive technology can help reduce emissions in the transportation sector and that school buses can provide electric storage for the grid.

The pilot project will be administered by the Vermont Energy Investment Corporation. It will consider the costs and benefits of operating electric school buses to determine whether the technology should be more widely adopted. Officials said that the goal is to reduce petroleum usage by about 22,680 gallons of gasoline equivalent.

“Not only will this pilot help Massachusetts transition to increased electric vehicles, but it will also demonstrate the opportunity to transport our children in clean vehicles, which will reduce costs and is better for our environment,” said Judith Judson, commissioner of the Department of Energy Resources. “These school buses will also make these four schools more resilient by providing backup power from the bus battery.”

The four school districts were each awarded grants of up to $350,000 for electric Type C school buses and chargers.

Related Topics: alternative fuels, electric bus, emissions, Massachusetts

Comments ( 0 )
More Stories
Product

Workshop Management Tool

Chevin Fleet Solutions’ Workshop Hub, when fully launched in early 2019, can be used as a central location for technicians to complete daily administration tasks such as time sheets, inspection sheets, and workshop audits from the workshop floor.

VAT runs a fleet of 80 school buses in Ohio.
Article

Contractors Connect on Recruiting Strategies, Fuel Outlook

Four school bus operators from four states find common ground in dealing with driver shortage, tapping into the benefits of GPS and video cameras, and assessing fuel options. For the most part, they’re sticking with diesel for now, but one is seeing success with an electric bus.

Product

Heat Recycling System

Idle Free Heat uses residual heat from the engine to keep the interior of the bus warm, circulating the heat through the vents when the bus is turned off.

Be the First to Know

Get the latest news and most popular articles from SBF delivered straight to your inbox. Stay on top of the school bus industry and don't miss a thing!