Special Needs Transportation

Bus agency to make safety upgrades after autistic student’s death

Posted on September 17, 2015

WHITTIER, Calif. — Bus agency Pupil Transportation Cooperative (PTC) announced in a news conference it will upgrade its safety practices immediately following the death of a 19-year-old autistic student on one of its buses last week, KABC reports.

The agency said there will be a top-to-bottom analysis of its procedures, and will push for electronic notification devices to be installed in its buses, the news source reports. Additionally, two adults will now monitor every bus to make sure no student is left on board. PTC also donated $10,000 to Lee’s family, according to KABC.

Hun Joon Lee, also known as Paul, was found dead in in an empty school bus that was parked in the agency’s bus yard last Friday afternoon. His family believes that he was left alone for hours on the bus during one of the hottest days of the summer, with temperatures reaching the triple digits in some areas.

Lee was apparently forgotten by a substitute bus driver, according to the news source. PTC spokesman Tom DeLapp said in the news conference that the investigation into Lee’s death is ongoing, and the bus driver is on administrative leave. DeLapp added that the substitute driver was a 10-year veteran who may not have known Lee's limitations. However, there is evidence the driver did not conduct a standard child-check procedure, which is included in the bus operator manual, but signed off on the procedure, according to the news source.

To read the full story, go here.

Related Topics: autism, California, fatalities, post-trip child check

Comments ( 1 )
  • Lynn Barton

     | about 3 years ago

    So very sad for this family and this student who suffered being left on this bus. You can not afford to take chances/assume...All is ok and check off done on the "to do" list!

More Stories
Greenville County (S.C.) Schools’ Special Needs Physical Performance Test (SNPPT) for aides and drivers is composed of 11 standards. Shown here, Teena Mitchell (left), special-needs transportation coordinator for the district, tests a driver on SNPPT standard number 7, which is securing cam straps around a seat and securing a safety vest within three minutes.

PHOTOS: Special-Needs Physical Testing Program

Greenville County (S.C.) Schools’ Special Needs Physical Performance Test is conducted every year to ensure that special-needs drivers and attendants have the skills and abilities required to do the job.

Be the First to Know

Get the latest news and most popular articles from SBF delivered straight to your inbox. Stay on top of the school bus industry and don't miss a thing!