Management

In harsh cold, school buses serve as warming stations

Thomas McMahon
Posted on January 24, 2014

NASHVILLE, Tenn. — With temperatures in most of the region hovering in the single digits on Thursday, Nashville residents who needed a break from the bitter cold could climb aboard a "Mobile Warming Station" — also known as a yellow school bus.

The Nashville Office of Emergency Management (OEM) partnered with Metro Nashville Public Schools to bring these innovative Mobile Warming Stations to the city's streets.

"This is just one of the ways Metro Nashville and the Office of Emergency Management is reaching out to the community and preparing for another day and night of dangerously low temperatures," OEM officials said in an announcement about the program.

OEM personnel and Metro school buses were stationed at Nashville's Riverfront Park and the Farmers Market area from 1 p.m. to 7 p.m. on Thursday, offering temporary shelter to anyone who needed a respite from the frigid conditions.

"OEM is continuing to encourage everyone to take shelter during this period of extreme cold, since the bitterly cold temperatures can lead to frostbite and hypothermia, resulting in serious injury or death," OEM officials said.

The temperature appeared to have eased up to some degree on Friday. According to the National Weather Service, the temperature in Nashville on Friday evening was 22 F, although with a wind chill of 12 F. The low on Friday night was expected to be 21 F.


Other recent news on school buses in cold conditions:

Frigid temperatures cancel bus routes, delay school

Related Topics: emergency planning, Tennessee, winter

Thomas McMahon Executive Editor
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