Management

Public outcry over decision to end regular-ed bus service

Kelly Roher
Posted on August 13, 2013

HOOVER, Ala. — Parents, students and other members of the community attended a public forum last week and voiced their opinions on the Hoover City Schools board of education’s decision to stop regular-education transportation for the 2014-15 school year.

As SBF previously reported, district officials expect that ending the service — to go into effect in August 2014 — will save more than $2.5 million per year, which can be redirected into classroom investment and/or deficit reduction.

The change does not affect special-education transportation service.

At the forum on Aug. 8, attendees spent two hours telling school officials they had made a mistake in deciding to end the service, and they begged them to reverse the decision, according to a story on al.com.

Hoover City Schools Superintendent Andy Craig said he has been evaluating possible variations of the plan to eliminate bus service, but some of those seem less plausible now. For example, he said that officials with the Alabama Department of Education have informed him that Hoover cannot charge a fee for students to ride the bus.

According to the story, Craig is still exploring whether it would be possible for a private company to contract with parent-teacher organizations to provide bus service and charge interested parents a fee. He has also been examining the possibility of phasing in the bus cuts over a longer period of time.

To read the full story, click here.

 

Related Topics: Alabama, budget cuts, school board

Comments ( 0 )
More Stories
Transfinder President and CEO Antonio Civitella presents the company's Ambassador of the Year award to Kecia Ling, the director of transportation operations at Savannah-Chatham County (Ga.) Public School System.
News

Transfinder Names ‘Ambassador of the Year’

The software developer selects Kecia Ling, the director of transportation operations at Savannah-Chatham County (Ga.) Public School System, for building routes for over 26,000 students in four months and overcoming transportation challenges during Hurricane Matthew.

A <I>PBS NewsHour</i> piece looks at the safety benefits and financial concerns involved in the issue of seat belts on school buses.
News

PBS Probes School Bus Seat Belt Debate

The PBS NewsHour piece looks at safety benefits and financial concerns involved in the issue. Interviews include transportation directors and NHTSA’s former administrator.

Be the First to Know

Get the latest news and most popular articles from SBF delivered straight to your inbox. Stay on top of the school bus industry and don't miss a thing!