Safety

Portable child restraint system folds into carrying case

Posted on June 13, 2013

HSM's portable child restraint system provides a five-point restraint system that converts to a carrying case. The adjustable strap creates a handle or shoulder strap for easy transport and storage. Photo courtesy of HSM.
HSM's portable child restraint system provides a five-point restraint system that converts to a carrying case. The adjustable strap creates a handle or shoulder strap for easy transport and storage. Photo courtesy of HSM.
HICKORY, N.C. — HSM, the new name of Hickory Springs Manufacturing Co., recently launched a portable child restraint system (PCR) that folds into a carrying case for convenient storage and transport when not in use.

HSM is a supplier of components to the transportation, furniture and bedding markets, among others.

The case also protects the seating system from wear, prolonging its useful life, according to the company.

Manufactured by HSM Transportation Solutions, the C.E. White PCR, patent pending, enables schools and transportation companies to provide a five-point restraint system that meets National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA) requirements for children.

“The seat is easy to install,” said Bob Knapp, product development, HSM. “Drivers simply place the carrying case on the seat, unfasten the Velcro lip and unfold the case, which becomes a cushioned seat for the child. A belt wraps around the bus seat and attaches to the PCR, while a built-in, five-point harness provides an adjustable restraint system that allows children from 20 to 90 pounds to sit comfortably and safely.”

When not in use, the seat converts to a carrying case with an adjustable strap that creates a handle or shoulder strap for easy transport and storage. Additionally, because the system is self-contained in the case, straps do not drag on the ground, reducing wear and tear and increasing the useful life of the system.

According to Knapp, NHTSA recommends child restraint systems be replaced every five years to address wear issues.

“It’s important to note that belts account for just one-third the cost of the entire child restraint system,” he added. “Our product offers customers the ability to replace just the belts, so that replacement costs are about one-third the cost of a total system replacement.”

Related Topics: child safety restraint systems

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