Maintenance

SEFAC pantograph lift saves space, maximizes access

Posted on February 21, 2012

BALTIMORE — SEFAC has introduced the OMER KAR pantograph lift to its product line.

This K Series lift raises the vehicle vertically, saving as much as 5 feet of floor space when compared to a parallelogram lift, which rises at an arc, company officials said.

The OMER KAR pantograph lift is available in capacities of 55,000 pounds and 77,000 pounds, and in runway lengths up to 36 feet.

There are no mechanical crossbeams linking the runways, making it easy for operators to wheel tools, oil drainers or transmission jacks under the vehicle. The lift can be installed either flush or surface mounted.

The major advantage of the KAR pantograph lift is the compact profile, officials said. All tripping hazards have been eliminated, providing clear floor access from all sides and maximizing under-vehicle access.

The KAR also has a low drive-on height, allowing low ground clearance vehicles to be lifted. For extra safety, each cylinder is backed up by a continuous engaged mechanical lock and a burst valve in the event of an oil leak.

Related Topics: vehicle lifts

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