Special Needs Transportation

District to train special-ed students to use Metro

Posted on January 9, 2012

WASHINGTON, D.C. — D.C. Public Schools and other city education leaders are identifying special-education students who could be trained to take the Metro to school in an effort to reduce the $26,000-per-student annual cost of transporting them by school bus, The Washington Examiner reports.  

The district spends approximately $92 million to bus 3,500 special-education students to school. Each school bus has an average of 5.5 students per route, and most buses can run only one route each morning and afternoon.

If a student is deemed an appropriate candidate to ride public transit, he or she is led through the route by an aide. Later, the aide or a parent will shadow the student to ensure that he or she travels safely.

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Greenville County (S.C.) Schools’ Special Needs Physical Performance Test (SNPPT) for aides and drivers is composed of 11 standards. Shown here, Teena Mitchell (left), special-needs transportation coordinator for the district, tests a driver on SNPPT standard number 7, which is securing cam straps around a seat and securing a safety vest within three minutes.
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PHOTOS: Special-Needs Physical Testing Program

Greenville County (S.C.) Schools’ Special Needs Physical Performance Test is conducted every year to ensure that special-needs drivers and attendants have the skills and abilities required to do the job.

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