Safety

New York gears up for Operation Safe Stop day

Posted on April 13, 2010

This Thursday, law enforcement officers throughout New York state will participate in an Operation Safe Stop day.

During a Safe Stop day, police officers ride on board school buses and in marked and unmarked patrol units on selected bus routes that have a history of motorists illegally passing the buses. Officers issue tickets to drivers who pass stopped school buses, and all violations are reported to a central command post so that final figures are available to state and local officials, as well as the media.

The Rochester Area Transportation Supervisors Association (RATSA), in partnership with the New York Association for Pupil Transportation and local law enforcement personnel, will mark this week’s Safe Stop day by hosting a press conference to help educate motorists about the importance of stopping for school buses while children are loading or unloading.

The press conference will be held at the Fairport Village Fire Department from 10 a.m. to 11 a.m. It will include an accident reenactment involving a school bus, with law enforcement and medical crews responding to the incident, as well as an opportunity for attendees to interview law enforcement and transportation professionals from Monroe County. 

The RATSA Website has several documents that can be helpful in spreading the word about Operation Safe Stop to drivers, police and retailers, and in identifying areas with a large number of illegal bus passing incidents.

To view the documents, visit the site and scroll down to “Operation Safe Stop Forms.”

Last year, 97 police agencies with 862 officers reportedly participated in Operation Safe Stop, issuing 1,697 traffic citations for vehicles passing stopped school buses. In addition, 1,930 other traffic citations were issued as a result of the safety awareness campaign.

Related Topics: stop-arm running/illegal passing

Comments ( 3 )
  • Dawn Shumate

     | about 8 years ago

    This is awesome information,I am here in El Dorado Ca. and I have started a project to do the same here in my state. I am so sick of motorist running my red lights that it inspired me to do something about it. I don't really know where to start but I need some funding to help me with the ideas that I do have.Thanks

  • See all comments
More Stories
Photo courtesy IMMI/SafeGuard
Article

4 Keys for Enforcing Seat Belt Use

Although buckling up is a habit for many kids, bus drivers need a policy, training, and community support behind them for successful enforcement. Convertible seats help with implementation.

Robert Sumwalt has been sworn in as the National Transportation Safety Board’s 14th chairman. Photo courtesy NTSB
News

Robert Sumwalt Named Chairman of NTSB

Sumwalt’s nomination for a two-year term by President Donald Trump is confirmed by the Senate and he is sworn in. Sumwalt has been serving as the agency’s acting chairman since March 31.

Video from a North Carolina school bus shows three cars hitting the bus one after the other, then speeding off. Shown here is an image from the video, which the Wilmington Police Department shared on its Facebook page.
News

3 Cars Hit North Carolina School Bus

School bus video footage shows the cars hitting the left side of the bus one after the other and speeding off after the bus driver drops off a student. 

Last year’s SBF Administrator of the Year award went to Ingrid Reitano (left) of New Jersey. She is seen here with her daughter, Tracy Lynch.
News

Nominate a Great Transportation Director

Know an exemplary school transportation director who deserves recognition? School Bus Fleet is accepting nominations for our Administrator of the Year award.

Minnesota motorists cited for passing a stopped school bus will now pay $500 instead of $300. Other crackdown efforts, such as making it harder to plea down a charge, have not passed the legislature. Photo courtesy Lois Cordes
News

Minnesota Stop-Arm Running Fines Increase

Motorists cited for passing a stopped school bus will now pay $500 instead of $300. Other crackdown efforts, such as making it harder to plea down a charge, have not passed the legislature.

Be the First to Know

Get the latest news and most popular articles from SBF delivered straight to your inbox. Stay on top of the school bus industry and don't miss a thing!