School Bus Contractors

FirstGroup supports efforts to reduce distracted driving

Posted on October 19, 2009
During the U.S. Department of Transportation’s summit on distracted driving, Transportation Secretary Ray LaHood discussed a federal rulemaking on text messaging and cell phone use by commercial drivers.
During the U.S. Department of Transportation’s summit on distracted driving, Transportation Secretary Ray LaHood discussed a federal rulemaking on text messaging and cell phone use by commercial drivers.

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CINCINNATI — FirstGroup America has expressed support for U.S. Transportation Secretary Ray LaHood’s proposal during this month’s Distracted Driving Summit that would restrict cell phone use and ban text messaging for commercial drivers, including school bus, interstate bus and truck drivers.

“The safety of our passengers, employees and other road users is our top priority, and we fully support the initiatives Secretary LaHood has proposed to prevent distracted driving,” said Gary Catapano, senior vice president of safety for FirstGroup America. “It is our hope that government officials, executives and citizens across North America join us in enforcing these safe driving practices.”

While several cities and states have passed legislation aimed at preventing distracted driving, LaHood encouraged more to enact these laws. FirstGroup America said it supports further legislation to prevent the use of mobile devices while driving and supports such initiatives that make driving safer for everyone.

In 2008, FirstGroup issued a company-wide policy prohibiting all employees or contractors on company business from using a mobile device, either handheld or hands-free, while driving. Employees across all divisions of FirstGroup are instructed to pull over at a safe location and turn off their vehicle’s engine before making a call or sending a text message.

Related Topics: cell phones, distracted driving

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