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September 18, 2012  |   Comments (3)   |   Post a comment

NHTSA updates school transportation crash stats

By Thomas McMahon


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There were 1,236 fatal school transportation-related crashes from 2001 to 2010, according to statistics from the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA).

The agency recently released a new edition of its School Transportation-Related Crashes report, covering the 10 years from 2001 to 2010.

During that time period, the 1,236 fatal school transportation-related crashes accounted for 0.34% of the total 363,839 fatal motor vehicle traffic crashes.

NHTSA defines a school transportation-related crash as “a crash which involves, either directly or indirectly, a school bus body vehicle, or a non-school bus functioning as a school bus, transporting children to or from school or school-related activities.”

From 2001 to 2010, 1,368 people died in school transportation-related crashes, which is an average of 137 fatalities per year. The majority (72%) of those people were occupants of other vehicles involved. Occupants of school transportation vehicles accounted for 7% of the fatalities, while the remaining 21% were non-occupants — pedestrians, bicyclists, etc.

According to NHTSA, an average of 18 school-age children die in school transportation-related crashes each year. On average, six of those are occupants of school transportation vehicles. The other 12 are pedestrians killed by school transportation vehicles or other vehicles involved in school bus-related crashes.

In 2010 specifically, there were 129 fatalities in school transportation-related crashes. Of those, 16 (12%) were occupants of school transportation vehicles: six drivers and 10 passengers.

To view NHTSA’s full report, go here.


Other recent news related to school transportation fatalities:

Tractor-trailer, school bus crash kills 4

Bus driver cited for careless driving in fatal crash


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Read more about: fatalities, NHTSA


Properly trained school bus drivers are able to "tune out" unruly children. Our district stresses "safety outside the bus first, then inside" then pull over and deal with circumstances. Experienced drivers do that automatically. While kids are distracting, drivers who have good attendance and therefore know where consistant problems lie are able to easily grade the severity of the distraction until they can safely pull over. God bless the sub drivers.

Sandra Blank    |    Jan 14, 2014 03:41 PM

How many children were hit by other motor vehicles that did not follow all the bus "stop" signals when they were preparing to get on a school bus or after they had gotten off the school bus? And how many of these were injuries and how many were fatalities? I have read numerous studies that we have a problem with people in passenger cars simply not stopping for school buses even though they have the flashing red lights to the rear, the pop-out "stop" sign and other methods of informing the public that children may be crossing the road to get on or after getting off a school bus.

Ray Cannefax    |    Aug 24, 2013 04:34 PM

I am surprised your statistics do not consider or mention school bus accidents caused by unruly or distractions caused by the students themselves. According to School Bus Magizine, the problem of unruly school bus riders is a major factor across the US in pulling the drivers attention away from driving responsibilities.

Jim Jones    |    Dec 29, 2012 05:01 PM

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