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January 15, 2010  |   Comments (2)   |   Post a comment

State Directors Delve Into Bus Crash Details

Changing regulations, innovative state programs and transporting homeless students are also discussed during the annual NASDPTS conference in Louisville, Ky.

by Thomas McMahon - Also by this author


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At the NASDPTS conference, Denny Coughlin (left) of Minneapolis Public Schools and state director Lt. Ed Carroll gave a presentation on the fatal 2008 school bus crash in Cottonwood, Minn.

At the NASDPTS conference, Denny Coughlin (left) of Minneapolis Public Schools and state director Lt. Ed Carroll gave a presentation on the fatal 2008 school bus crash in Cottonwood, Minn.

Harold Dennis almost couldn’t go on the church trip to an amusement park. If he hadn’t, he would have missed one of the worst bus crashes in U.S. history.

But despite his single mom’s financial troubles, Dennis ended up being able to go to Kings Island with his friends that day in 1988. On the way home, their church bus — a former school bus that was built just before the 1977 safety standards began — was struck head-on by a drunken driver near Carrollton, Ky.

The fiery crash killed 27 people. Dennis was able to escape, though he was left badly burned.

At the annual conference of the National Association of State Directors of Pupil Transportation Services (NASDPTS) in Louisville, Ky., in late October and early November, Dennis shared the details of the crash, the effects it had on enhancing bus safety and on drunken-driving laws, and how he was able to persevere and become a star athlete.

Safety improvements in the wake of the Carrollton crash included a concentrated effort in most states to phase out all pre-1977 buses, the upgrade of Federal Motor Vehicle Safety Standard (FMVSS) 301 — related to fuel tank integrity — and the revision of FMVSS 217 to require that the total area of emergency exits be based on the designated seating capacity.

Dennis described the tribulations he endured after the crash. Among the children who lost their lives was his best friend, Andy. Dennis told NASDPTS attendees that he went through survivor guilt. And he spent two months in the hospital being treated for his wounds, undergoing skin grafts and other painful treatments. Yet Dennis found the strength to move past the tragedy and attain success.

“I had to grow up at an early age — become a man at age 14,” he recalled. “I didn’t do it alone, and it wasn’t easy.”
Although he didn’t make the soccer team his freshman year of high school, he went on to become an all-state player and was recruited by the University of Louisville. After a year, he transferred to the University of Kentucky, where he walked on to the football team and then earned a full scholarship.

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Escribo desde Argentina-buenos Aires ,Mar del Plata .Me gustaría tener información de los avances que tienen Uds. en materia de seguridad en el transporte de escolares.Desde ya michas gracias

vilma ines kovacs    |    Feb 07, 2010 06:39 AM

Is the recommended speed limit where a bus not stop to drop off students that need to cross the road.

Jim Whaley    |    Feb 01, 2010 07:01 PM

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